Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) by Melanie Hofmann

Gray Fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus) by Melanie Hofmann

The rich fauna of the UC Botanical Garden has always been a source of interest for visitors, particularly the Garden’s abundant (and easily seen) newts, lizards and birds.  Newts are best viewed in late winter during the mating season, especially in the clear waters of the Japanese Pool, while lizards are most common on warm sunny days. Birds are common year-round, especially on the regular bird walks. While the mammals tend to more seclusive during the day, sightings of our native gray fox are common as are the scampering of voles, heads of gophers popping up out of their tunnels and the fleeting rabbits ‘Critter’ cams at night reveal the abundance of raccoons, skunks, and an occasional coyote. The rich insect fauna includes a wealth of butterflies, native bees, dragonflies and many others (like the ladybird beetle swarms in fall).  The Garden is truly an ‘oasis’ for the local and migrating wildlife.