Dr. Lew Feldman, Garden Director The onset of fall brings cooler weather, shorter days, and brilliant color seen across a range of plants. We are presented with stunning displays of orange, yellow, red and purple leaves. What causes the foliage to change color? The environmental cues that make a plant ready for winter are typically…

Christine Manoux, Director of Education and Visitor Engagement; Cat Callaway, Horticulturist On Monday, October 10, 2022 (Indigenous People’s Day), the Garden hosted a special event for the public in our Crops of the World Garden collection in partnership with the local cultural group Indigenous Permaculture (IP). In this area, the Garden arranges plantings of food crops based on areas…

Press Release | by Krista Vossekuil, Development Director The UC Botanical Garden at Berkeley (Garden, www.botanicalgarden.berkeley.edu) is usually bursting with blooms this time of year, but one section is a standout among wide-eyed visitors and staff. The spectacular Southern African Collection, located southeast of the entrance kiosk, is overflowing with an almost unbelievable splash of color…

Sophia Warsh, Horticulturist | California As spring progresses, poppies (Eschscholzia and Papaver) are everywhere in California! But there are some other members of the poppy family (Papaveraceae) to explore – Dendromecon and Romneya, California’s shrubby poppies.  Dendromecon, which is greek for tree poppy, is a shrub to small tree native to California. The species we…

Dr. Lew Feldman, Garden Director In this edition of IGYA we will consider bark, which is the outermost layer of trees, woody shrubs and vines, and which can be thought of as the “skin” of a woody plant. Bark is essential for a tree’s survival. Bark has an important role in protecting the plant from…

Dr. Lew Feldman, Garden Director One of the questions that students frequently ask me is what is the difference between “hard” and “soft” woods. The answer, however, is not straightforward because the terms hardwood and softwood do not necessarily relate to the density or hardness of the wood itself. Rather, the wood type depends on…

James Fong, Horticulturist | Asia, Australasia As you take a stroll into the Australasia collection this time of year, you may notice the giant tree ferns or the magnificent rimu, but dive deeper into the collection, and you will find the vibrant, glowing, cone-like structures sitting in the trees and shrubs like ornaments on a…

Ethan Fenner, Horticulturist | Southern Africa Plants have evolved a variety of ways to protect themselves under less-than-ideal conditions. In the Western Cape Province of South Africa, where rainfall is limited to wintertime, species must find ways of making it through long periods of drought. It is advantageous for plants to develop some kind of…

Dr. Lew Feldman, Garden Director In this issue of IGYA we consider the process of water movement in plants, over great distances, such as to the tops of tall trees, without the aid of a pump. To appreciate how plants carryout this great feat, we need to consider three elements; the pathway (plumbing system) along…

Dr. Lew Feldman, Garden Director In previous IGYAs, we discussed two major plant signaling molecules: auxin and gibberellin. In this third write-up on plant growth and development controls, we will consider the molecule ETHYLENE, agriculturally and commercially the most important plant signaling molecules. Unlike auxin and gibberellin, which are moved about the plant via internal…

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